Rail operating centres (ROC) are buildings that house all signallers, signalling equipment, ancillaries and operators for the United Kingdom’s main rail network.

Rugby’s ROC is one of twelve new centres that will eventually control the entire rail network in Britain, replacing more than 800 signal boxes. According to Network Rail, all 12 centres will have more advanced signalling tools and technology that will help reduce delays, improve performance, increase capacity, provide better information to passengers. All-in-all the upgrades will offer better value for money for passengers and taxpayers.

 

Rugby ROC is one of twelve ROC in Britain. It is responsible for controlling the signalling in the West Midlands.

Transport is considered part of the UK’s CNI – a critical sector necessary for a country to function and upon which daily life depends. Damage or downtime to Rugby’s ROC could affect the operation of the whole of the West Midlands region of the rail network. To meet the threat, the designers, DJ Goode designed a concrete wall to protect against blast and hostile vehicles. To protect against trespass, GJ Goode also required a fence which was accredited by CPNI to protect critical national infrastructure as well as meeting Network Rail’s Class 1a specification for rail fencing.

The area surrounding Rugby Roc has high public use. Situated near to Rugby station, between the West Coast Main Line and Rugby College. Due to the critical functions of Rugby ROC it had to be highly secure from trespass and unauthorised access. Network Rail required a perimeter security solution suitable for securing the UK’s Critical National Infrastructure.

 

DJ Goode found Barkers StronGuard via CPNI as it was the only solution to meet the requirements. StronGuard™, our high security palisade fencing was installed on a wall designed by DJ Goode to protect the ROC from trespass, blast and hostile vehicles.

Have you got a question? Our fencing team will be happy to help.

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